VHM-2014-2015-lores - page 25

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15.8%
Students
reported
that they
had seriously
considered
attempting
suicide during
the 12 months
preceding
the survey.
12.8%
Students
reported that
they made a
plan about
how they
would attempt
suicide during
the 12 months
preceding
the survey.
7.8%
Students
reported
that they had
attempted
suicide one
or more times
during the
12 months
preceding
the survey.
2.4%
Students
reported
that they had
made a suicide
attempt that
resulted in
an injury,
poisoning, or
an overdose
that required
medical
attention.
what they do not need … It is the psychological lev-
el of pain that motivates their suicide attempt. The
problem is that they cannot bear the pain,” Bissett
said. “When people speak with compassion and
appreciation for the pain that leads to the suicidal
thoughts, they are doing exactly the right thing.”
Many people consumed with suicidal thoughts
don’t say anything because they fear medication or
hospitalization. Not all people considering suicide
need medication, as sometimes suicidal ideation
has more to do with a temporary situation than a
biochemical imbalance. And only in extreme cases
are people hospitalized; many people with suicidal
ideation can stay at home with a solid safety plan,
which often includes securing weapons and medi-
cations, staying home with a loved one or caregiver
and agreeing on a set amount of time to refrain
from driving and consuming alcohol. Sobriety is
often important in a safety plan because “a signifi-
cant percentage of people are intoxicated when
they complete their suicide plan,” Bissett said.
Speak Up, Reach Out teaches students and
people in the community to ACT: Acknowledge,
Care and Tell. Last year, trainers taught 1,200
middle- and high-school students to identify symp-
toms of depression and suicidality and encour-
aged kids to seek help through the use of ACT.
“If you have more eyes out in the community
to spot the crises — the verbal and behavior cues
… (then) we’re not losing people when they’re in
crisis; we’re helping people when they get to that
point,” Fiore said. “The (community) need is huge.”
Suicidal thoughts and attempts are sig-
nificantly higher in young adults, ages 18-29
years, and suicide accounts for 20 percent of
deaths for persons ages 15-24. The higher rates
in young people involve their impulsivity and
the fact that they don’t consider the perma-
nent consequence of suicide, Bissett said.
“I often say that suicide is a permanent solution
to a temporary problem,” he said. “They will get
through this; they may just not know how — how
to navigate the crisis ahead. But with support
and the right plan, they can get through it.”
Fiore has found this to be true. Even though
thoughts of suicide still pop up, she no longer
takes them seriously or beats herself up for
having them. She describes her thoughts like a
train station: all kinds of trains go through, but
that doesn’t mean she has to ride every one.
“I realize, ‘Oh, it’s just a thought,’ and I
don’t have to give my thoughts so much
weight or meaning — or make (myself)
wrong for having them,” she said.
Instead, she continues to walk along and
share her story, which, in turn, gives oth-
ers the freedom to share theirs.
"When someone voices
suicidal thoughts, they are
often met with judgment,
and that is exactly what
they do not need.”
Suicide rates
for
FEMALES
are
highest for ages
45-54.
Suicide rates
for
MALES
are
highest for ages
75 and older.
YOUNG PEOPLE
AND SUICIDE
In a 2011 nationally-representative
sample of youth in grades 9-12
SUICIDE RATES BY AGE AND SEX
AGES
25-34
2
nd
leading
cause
of
death
AGES
15-24
3
rd
leading
cause
of
death
AGES
45-54
4
th
leading
cause
of
death
AGES
55-64
8
th
leading
cause
of
death
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